Friday, October 18, 2013

Footnote charm

Two tracks diverge in a yellow wood, and
THEY BOTH LEAD TO THE DEATH OF INNOCENTS.
(Image: https://www.flickr.com/photos/scfiasco/4490322916/in/dateposted-public/)
In the middle of her famous essay "The Trolley Problem" (stop laughing—it's famous among ethicists), philosopher Judith Jarvis Thomson pauses to make a pretty endearing gesture of good-humored self-deprecation, which must rank on the list of most stylish footnotes ever:
14. Notice that in this case too the agent does not use the one if he proceeds. (This case, along with a number of other cases I have been discussing, comes from Thomson, Killing, Letting Die, and the Trolley Problem, 59 The Monist 204 (1976). Mrs. Thomson seems to me to have been blundering around in the dark in that paper, but the student of this problem may possibly find some of the cases she discusses useful.). [sic]

2 comments:

  1. https://www.flickr.com/photos/scfiasco/4490322916/in/dateposted-public/

    Please remove my photo from your webpage immediately or properly attribute it to me as per Creative Commons Licensing.

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  2. Of course: I'm happy to do so, and am sorry not to have done so in the first place. My apologies.

    ReplyDelete